Jelly Roll Morton
 Library of Congress Recordings

 “The Saga of Mr. Jelly Lord”
 Circle Limited Edition Set of 45 twelve-inch Records

 Coolidge Auditorium : May, June and December 1938

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS RECORDINGS
“THE SAGA OF MR. JELLY LORD”

Introduction  ·  Background to the Recordings
John R.T. Davies  ·  Bill Nowlin Ph.D.
Circle Limited Edition Set of 45 twelve-inch Records
Library of Congress : Jelly Roll and Alan Lomax Narrative
Recordings and Discography  ·  Out of Print Recordings
Music Roll Recordings and Rollography
Recommended Listening  ·  References  ·  Kudos

INTRODUCTION

Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, born 30th October 1864, Chicago, Illinois — died 4th November 1953, Cambridge, Massachusetts, holds an esteemed position in the history of American music. As founder of the Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation at the Library of Congress, her gifts helped shape the Music Division of the Library of Congress and much of musical life both in America and abroad — as no benefactor has since.

Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge was already well known as a patroness of music before she approached the Library in 1924, seeking a permanent home for the chamber music festivals and musical commissions that she had sponsored in western Massachusetts for a number of years.

Working with Librarian of Congress, Herbert Putnam and the new chief of the Music Division, Carl Engel, she submitted a letter of intent on 12th November 1924, to provide for the donation of an auditorium. (and personally presented a check for $60,000 to cover the cost of its construction to Mr. Engel) to the Library. President Calvin Coolidge (no relation) signed into law the bill accepting Mrs. Coolidge’s offer of the Auditorium on 23rd January 1925, and construction began immediately. The actual cost of the auditorium exceeded $60,000, but Mrs. Coolidge made up the difference.

The Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Medal for Eminent Services to Chamber Music was inaugurated in 1932. The Coolidge Foundation Program for Contemporary Chamber Music was established to lend scores and parts of contemporary music to enable performing groups to broaden the repertories.

Honorary degrees were awarded to Elizabeth Coolidge by Mount Holyoke Smith College, Yale, Mills College, the University of California and Pomona. She was inducted into France’s Legion of Honor in 1931, received a key to Frankfurt, and in 1935 was awarded the Order of the Crown of Belgium, and in 1937 the Order of Leopold, King of Belgium.

BACKGROUND TO THE RECORDINGS

It was record collector Sidney Martin who introduced Jelly Roll Morton to Alan Lomax to discuss details for the famous Library of Congress Recordings. The series of interviews and recordings, totalling about eight hours, began on 23rd May 1938 and concluded with the final session on 14th December 1938.

Alan Lomax was born in Austin, Texas on 31st January 1915. In 1933 he assisted his father, John Avery Lomax, on their first recording field trip which was commissioned by the Library of Congress. From 1933 to 1942 he either worked alone, or accompanied his father, as well as his sister Bess, Zora Neale Hurston, Mary Elizabeth Barnicle, John Work, and others. He died on 19th July 2002.

He went on to record folk and traditional music on behalf of the Library of Congress throughout the Southern United States, as well as in New England, Michigan, Wisconsin, New York, Ohio, Haiti, and the Bahamas. Artists such as Leadbelly, Woody Guthrie, Aunt Mollie Jackson, and Muddy Waters made their first recordings during these field trips.

In 1934 he published, with John A. Lomax — “American Ballads and Folksongs.” Later publications with his father include, “Negro Folk Songs as Sung by Leadbelly” (1936), “Cowboy Songs” (1937), “Our Singing Country” (1938), and “Folk Song: USA” (1946). He was appointed assistant in charge to the Archive in 1937. Due to a small congressional appropriation for the support of the Archive, Alan became the first Archive worker to be paid from Library funds.

In 1938 he recorded more than eight hours of Jelly Roll Morton’s singing, playing and spoken recollections for the Library of Congress, documenting the birth of jazz by one of its founders. These recordings became the basis for his book, Mister Jelly Roll (1950).

Alan Lomax used a small portable Presto disk recorder, which had been adapted to operate on batteries for field recordings. The recorder did not always operate at the correct speed and the original Circle records, which were first issued beginning in the fall of 1947, in limited edition albums of 45 twelve-inch records, need to be played back at around 85 r.p.m to enable them to be pitch corrected.

This anomaly with the Circle records may not be entirely due to the fault with Alan Lomax’s recorder. In Storyville magazine issue No. 128, page 69, Michael Bowen writes that Bob Hilbert of Pumpkin Records, had spoken with the Library of Congress staff and gained the impression that when the original copies were run off for Circle Records, Rudi Blesh had messed the Library staff and technicians about to such an extent, that they had run off the dubs without any technical line-ups or checks, just to get rid of him.
[C 69]

Kenneth Lloyd Bright, a Circle official, made a trip to San Francisco to contact the executor of the Morton estate, a lawyer named Hugh MacBeth (Macbeth). MacBeth (Macbeth), probably a bit fed up with everybody’s attempts to get their hands on the gold mine left by his late friend Jelly Roll, reportedly told Bright, “If you’re here to talk about the Morton records, the answer is “No.” But after listening to an explanation of Circle’s motives in the matter, MacBeth (Macbeth) finally granted the permission in July 1946, and Circle went about the business of preparing the material for public release. [D]

Previous to the public release there was one set of dubbings made from the originals for a group of collectors, including Bill Russell and the late Hoyte Kline, in 1939, and fifth and sixth re-dubbings from these, bristling with surface noises, were all that were available to be heard. [D]

Well-heeled jazz enthusiasts applied to Circle Sound Inc., 38 East 4th Street, New York, for the “The Saga of Mr. Jelly Lord” and received 45 dark Vinylite twelve-inch records arranged in 12 albums. Beginning August—September 1947 two albums were issued every three months until the set was complete. The albums, which housed the Vinylite records, were designed by artist Jimmy Ernst. [CR]

According to contemporary sources only 250 sets were sold, although Roger Richard, whose set is #224, has reported to me that the highest numbered set known to him is #309. [E] Ate van Delden also reports that his colleague, Alfred Ticoalu, has a partial set with one of the albums numbered #326. [H]  Given the original subscription fee of $120.00 and the small number of sets sold, makes them a priceless rarity today.

Rudi Blesh, who owned Circle Records, was disappointed with poor sales of the 78 r.p.m record sets. So, in 1950, he took the decision to enter the twelve-inch micro-groove market. He hoped for better sales with the new format, but this did not materialize as the content of the 12 Circle LPs (L 14001—L 14012) turned out to be a mere copy of the Circle 78 r.p.m. records — including the speed faults.

In 1957, Riverside issued 12 LPs (RLP 9001—RLP 9012) in the twelve-inch micro-groove format. These too, were copies of the Circle 78 r.p.m. records. Reeves Sound Studios undertook the re-mastering work and erased a few ‘plops’ and ‘klonks’ but generally, there was not much of a sound improvement. There was however, a successful attempt to correct the speed faults.
[E]

JOHN R.T. DAVIES

The late John R.T. Davies is probably the most respected and successful sound engineer in the business of re-mastering vintage 78 r.p.m. disc recordings. He has produced some of the best CD reissues — and LPs before that. We all owe him a tremendous debt of gratitude, especially for his pioneering work with re-mastering the Library of Congress recordings, which appeared on the Classic Jazz Masters and Swaggie LPs in the early 1970s. Below is John’s account of his work on this project:

“Actually, the CJM and Swaggie LPs were not my first attempt at re-mastering the Library of Congress recordings. Earlier, Philips had asked me to put together a set which I worked out as six twelve-inch LPs. This meant some pretty heavy loading, including as I recall, one side, which ran for about 36 minutes. Philips said that such a duration was not feasible and although I actually cut a master for this particular side, to show that it was possible, they decided to abandon the idea.

“The CJM and Swaggie LPs contain the same content of the Circle 78 r.p.m. records. There is not a great deal more to tell about the make-up of the CJM and Swaggie sets. I figured out the original recording order using the descriptions in Tom Cusack’s little book. There were, I recall, several instances of Circle editing which had to be “unedited” in order to present the available material in the original order of recording. In some instances, bridging pieces had to be created to restore what seemed to be the original continuity.

“It was important to me that the narratives be restored, as far as possible, since these were the real treasures of the recordings. Editing and cleaning up were, of necessity, a matter of trim, cut, chop, slice and the laborious process of scraping the clicks and pops off the tape (without cutting — as far as possible). Would that I had “Cedar” or “Mousetrap” then! Methods were fairly primitive — but, looking back, it was a pretty neat job for the time!

“I don’t actually remember how long it took me to do — or when I did it. I do remember however, an object lesson in marketing. Carl Hällström, of Classic Jazz Masters, offered the first couple of discs for sale and was exceedingly disappointed in the reception. Having persuaded him to make the whole lot available, I believe he had no difficulty in finding his customers.”
[F]

© March 2001 John R.T. Davies

Note: Circle (L 14001—L 14012), Riverside (RLP 9001—RLP 9012), Classic Jazz Masters (CJM 2—CJM 9) and Swaggie (S 1311—S 1318) LPs have long been out of print, which means that a whole new generation of Morton devotees have missed out on the narrative treasures of the Library of Congress recordings. This has now been resolved, as indicated by the comprehensive article below.

BILL NOWLIN Ph.D.

Bill Nowlin Ph.D. is co-founder of Rounder Records and is responsible for supervision of the North American Traditions series. He earned his Ph.D. at Tufts and was a college teacher until the duties of working at Rounder overwhelmed him. He has co-ordinated many of Rounder’s most important reissues of traditional music, including the massive Alan Lomax Collection. Bill is also a well-known expert on baseball, particularly the Boston Red Sox. I invited Bill to give an account of his involvement with Jelly Roll Morton’s Library of Congress recordings.

“In 1994 Rounder Records released 4 CDs (CD 1091 — CD 1094) of Morton’s recordings. The CDs contain essentially all the music recorded at the Library of Congress by Alan Lomax. The original recordings contain an extensive amount of conversation as well — mostly Morton talking, with Lomax prompting. It’s my understanding that this interview was one of the earliest and most successful attempts at oral history. Lomax published Morton’s account in the book Mister Jelly Roll.

“We first talked to staff at the Library of Congress many years earlier, at least a decade (and maybe two), before this actual release. There was a lot of concern at the Library — and appropriately so — that Morton’s heirs be contacted, their permission secured and any royalties paid them. Because Alan Lomax was a Library employee, his permission was not actually required. I had the impression that others had tried to contact the heirs and not gotten anywhere, so I didn’t really pursue it.

“Some years passed before I thought I should make the effort anyhow, however unlikely the result. I finally decided to take the bull by the horns and therefore asked the Library for the names they had on file as the proper heirs of Mr. Morton. They provided the information and I contacted them. Much to my surprise, it was actually quite easy to reach agreement.

“So we were all set to go. Naturally, we reached out to Alan Lomax and requested his participation, but he was preoccupied with other efforts at the time. I began to ask around and was soon given the name of Prof. James Dapogny, who fortunately agreed to take on the task. The story is fairly well told in the notes to our albums. As Jim worked with the masters, it was clear to him that some of the masters were originally recorded at the wrong speed and that all of the earlier releases of the material presented these Morton recordings at the wrong speed! Jim worked with Library engineers to restore the recordings to the way they sounded as Morton played the music, not the way the faulty equipment had recorded it.

“What we wound up with was 9 hours of sound and music. We had originally planned to release the full body of work. Hence, this would have been 9 compact discs, not the 4 we actually did release. There are two reasons we went with just four instead of the full nine. One was practical, and the other was political.

“From the beginning of this round of conversations with the Library, talking with Alan Jabbour of the American Folklife Center, Alan had the idea of presenting a symposium at the Library and having various scholars present papers on Morton, which would then be gathered into a booklet and issued along with the complete set of recordings. For one reason or another, the symposium never eventuated — though it’s an idea which is still quite a good one.

“The Center at this time was also going through a tortuous process of self-preservation, where every two years, if I recall correctly, funding for the Center had to be re-appropriated by Congress. There was always this sword of Damocles hanging over the Center that it could lose its funding. Some connected with the Center worried that the release of the full set of Morton recordings could jeopardize Congressional funding. If too big a splash was made, and Congresspeople actually listened to the language Morton used and some of the things he said, it wouldn’t be too much of a stretch to envision someone grandstanding: ‘Why is the Library of Congress releasing these dirty, vile, filthy lyrics?’ The repercussions could be significant.

“At the same time that this concern was on my mind, I considered the way the albums would look to the public. Seeing this as a series of 9 individual CDs — instead of one big 9-CD set — I realized that because more than half the actual time was Morton monologue, some of the albums would really have relatively small amount of music on them. To release the CDs faithfully recreating the sequence of Morton’s talk and performance — the only way which really would make sense in treating the full body of work — would, I realized with a careful look — result in one album only having two musical performances on it, and another having, as I recall, just three. I worried that a customer in a store picking up a CD and seeing it had just two tracks on it would simply not buy it.

“These two concerns came together — the political one and the concern about saleability of CDs with just 2 or 3 tracks on them — and I decided that perhaps the best way to go was to take the digital masters we already had and simply extract the music from them, leaving the spoken word material for later release. This idea was well-received at the Library, seen as more or less testing the waters for Congressional reaction. (As it happens, there never was any reaction from Members of Congress, either positive or negative). This also had the advantage of providing more time to organize the symposium, and ultimately release the full-recorded work.

“About five years ago, we began working on the Alan Lomax Collection. We’ve released over 55 albums at this point, and plan to continue with at least another 100 albums, releasing the full life’s work of Alan Lomax, and some of his colleagues. Naturally, the Morton recordings are a jewel in the Lomax crown. We plan to release a boxed set of the entire sessions — as originally planned — but now as part of the Collection. The process is underway.”
[G]

© March 2001 Bill Nowlin Ph.D.

Note: The project was completed in September 2005 when Rounder Records issued a boxed set of Jelly Roll Morton’s Complete Library of Congress Recordings.

CIRCLE LIMITED EDITION SET OF 45 TWELVE-INCH RECORDS
Coolidge Auditorium


THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS RECORDINGS

Coolidge Auditorium, Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 1st and Independence Streets, SE, Washington DC

Recorded by Alan Lomax

Begun 23rd May 1938 : Concluded 14th December 1938


Jelly Roll Morton and Alan Lomax

Jelly Roll Morton (piano 1 — vocal 2 — speech 3); Alan Lomax (speech 4).



Album I

TIGER RAG (Original quadrille)

JAZZ STARTED IN NEW ORLEANS

AFS Number

AFS 1648-B


AFS 1649-A
AFS 1649-B

AFS 1659-A

AFS 1659-B


AFS 1640-A

AFS 1640-B

AFS 1641-A


AFS 1675-A
Original Circle Title

TIGER RAG  1 - 2 - 3 - 4
(Original quadrille)

I.   TIGER RAG  1 - 2 - 3
II.  PANAMA  1 - 2 - 3

MR. JELLY LORD  1 - 2

I.   “SWEET PAPA JELLY ROLL”  1 - 3 - 4
II.  ORIG. JELLY ROLL BLUES  1 - 3 - 4

ANCESTRY AND BOYHOOD  1 - 3 - 4

BOY AT THE PIANO  1 - 3 - 4

I.   THE MISERERE  1 - 3 - 4
II.  BOYHOOD MEMORIES  1 - 3 - 4

HYENA STOMP  1
Original Issue

Circle jm-1


Circle jm-2


Circle jm-3

Circle jm-4


Circle jm-5

Circle jm-6

Circle jm-7


Circle jm-8


Album II

THE ANIMULE BALL  Part 1

WAY DOWN YONDER

AFS Number

AFS 1657-A

AFS 1657-B


AFS 1661-A

AFS 1661-B


AFS 1662-B

AFS 1647-B


AFS 1648-A


AFS 1648-B

Original Circle Title

THE ANIMULE BALL  Part 1  1 - 2 - 3

I.   THE ANIMULE BALL,  Part 2  1 - 2 - 3
II.  SCAT SONG  1 - 2 - 3 - 4

“SHOOTING THE AGATE”  1 - 2 - 3 - 4

I.   “NO DOUBT THE FINEST FOOD”  1 - 2 - 3 - 4
II.  SEE SEE RIDER  (beg.)  1 - 2 - 3 - 4

SEE SEE RIDER  (concl.)  1 - 2 - 3 - 4

NEW ORLEANS FUNERAL,  Part 1  1 - 2 - 3 - 4
(“We specialized in spirituals”)

NEW ORLEANS FUNERAL,  Part 2  1 - 2 - 3
(“Flee as a bird to the mountain”)

NEW ORLEANS FUNERAL,  Part 3  1 - 2 - 3 - 4
(“Oh, didn’t he ramble”)
Original Issue

Circle jm-9

Circle jm-10


Circle jm-11

Circle jm-12


Circle jm-13

Circle jm-14


Circle jm-15


Circle jm-16



Album III

DISCOURSE ON JAZZ  Part 4 Sweet, soft, plenty rhythm

JAZZ IS STRICTLY MUSIC

AFS Number

AFS 1650-A


AFS 1650-B



AFS 1651-A



AFS 1651-B


AFS 1653-B



AFS 1654-A




AFS 1639-A

AFS 1639-B

Original Circle Title

DISCOURSE ON JAZZ,  Part 1  1 - 3 - 4
Tempo, melody and riffs

DISCOURSE ON JAZZ,  Part 2  1 - 3 - 4
Discords and false harmony
KANSAS CITY STOMP,  Part I  1 - 3 - 4

DISCOURSE ON JAZZ,  Part 3  1 - 3 - 4
Breaks and riffs
KANSAS CITY STOMP, Concl.  1 - 3 - 4

DISCOURSE ON JAZZ,  Part 4  1 - 3 - 4
Sweet, soft, plenty rhythm

I.   RANDALL’S RAG  1 - 2 - 3
II.  MAPLE LEAF RAG,  Part 1
(St. Louis Style)

(I)  MAPLE LEAF RAG,  Concl.  1 - 3
(St. Louis Style)
(II) MAPLE LEAF RAG
(Morton’s transformation)

KING PORTER STOMP  1 - 3

I.   “He had a yen for my style.”  1 - 3 - 4
II.  YOU CAN HAVE IT
  1 - 2 - 3 - 4
Original Issue

Circle jm-17


Circle jm-18



Circle jm-19



Circle jm-20


Circle jm-21



Circle jm-22




Circle jm-23

Circle jm-24



Album IV

MAMA 'NITA

THE SPANISH TINGE

AFS Number

AFS 1684-A

AFS 1685-A

AFS 1681-B

AFS 1682-A

AFS 1682-B

AFS 1683-A

AFS 1683-B

AFS 1673-A
Original Circle Title

MAMA ’NITA  1

SPANISH SWAT  1

NEW ORLEANS BLUES  1 - 3

LA PALOMA  1 - 3 - 4

CREEPY FEELING  Part 1  1 - 3

CREEPY FEELING  Concl.  1

THE CRAVE  1

FICKLE FAY CREEP  1
Original Issue

Circle jm-25

Circle jm-26

Circle jm-27

Circle jm-28

Circle jm-29

Circle jm-30

Circle jm-31

Circle jm-32


Album V

AARON HARRIS  Part 1

BAD MAN BALLADS

AFS Number

AFS 1644-B

AFS 1645-A

AFS 1645-B



AFS 1646-A


AFS 1662-A

AFS 1679-B


AFS 1680-A


AFS 1680-B

Original Circle Title

AARON HARRIS  Part 1  1 - 3 - 4

AARON HARRIS  Part II  1 - 2 - 3

I.   AARON HARRIS,  concl.  1 - 3 - 4
II.  ROBERT CHARLES,  Pt. 1  1 - 3 - 4
“Robert Charles was a marksman”

ROBERT CHARLES, concl.  1 - 3 - 4
“All for the trouble of Robert Charles”

“They were tough babies”  1 - 3 - 4

GEORGIA SKIN GAME,  Pt. I  1 - 3
“Of all the games in history”

GEORGIA SKIN GAME,  Pt. II  1 - 3
“Come on, let’s roll up”

GEORGIA SKIN GAME,  concl.  1 - 2 - 3 - 4
“He sang a little song like this”
Original Issue

Circle jm-33

Circle jm-34

Circle jm-35



Circle jm-36


Circle jm-37

Circle jm-38


Circle jm-39


Circle jm-40



Album VI

THE PEARLS  Part I

THE JAZZ PIANO SOLOIST

AFS Number

AFS 1677-A

AFS 1677-B

AFS 1679-A

AFS 1685-B

AFS 1678-A

AFS 1673-B
Original Circle Title

THE PEARLS  Part I  1

THE PEARLS  concl.  1

PEP  1

AIN’T MISBEHAVIN’  1 - 2

BERT WILLIAMS  1

JUNGLE BLUES  1
Original Issue

Circle jm-41

Circle jm-42

Circle jm-43

Circle jm-44

Circle jm-45

Circle jm-46


Album VII

SAMMY DAVIS and TONY JACKSON   PRETTY BABY

EVERYONE HAD HIS OWN STYLE

AFS Number

AFS 1642-A


AFS 1642-B


AFS 1688-A


AFS 1688-B


AFS 1646-B

AFS 1647-A


AFS 1666-A


AFS 1666-B


Original Circle Title

SAMMY DAVIS and TONY JACKSON  1 - 3 - 4
PRETTY BABY  1 - 2 - 3

TONY JACKSON, ALFRED WILSON,  3 - 4
ALBERT CARROLL and KID ROSS  3 - 4

MAMIE DESDOUMES  1 - 2 - 3
and MAMIE’S BLUES  1 - 2 - 3

ALBERT CARROLL and BUDDY BERTRAND  1 - 2 - 3
THE CRAZY CHORD RAG  1 - 2 - 3

THE GAME KID and his blues  1 - 2 - 3

I.   “GAME KID WOULDN’T WORK.”  1 - 3
II.  BUDDY CARTER (“Remember that bass?”)

BAD SAM and BENNY FRENCHY  Part 1  1 - 3 - 4
(“Oh, play it Mr. Frenchy!”)

BAD SAM and BENNY FRENCHY,  concl.  1 - 3
(“So I got out and played anyway.”)
ALL THAT I ASK IS LOVE  1 - 2 - 3
Original Issue

Circle jm-47


Circle jm-48


Circle jm-49


Circle jm-50


Circle jm-51

Circle jm-52


Circle jm-53


Circle jm-54




Album VIII

WOLVERINE BLUES  Part 1

JELLY AND THE BLUES

AFS Number

AFS 1675-B

AFS 1676-A

AFS 1655-B



AFS 1686-B

AFS 1670-A

AFS 1656-B
Original Circle Title

WOLVERINE BLUES  Part 1  1 - 2

WOLVERINE BLUES  Concluded  1 - 2

LOWDOWN BLUES  1 - 2 - 3
(“I could sit right here and think a thousand miles
    away.”)

MICHIGAN WATER BLUES  1 - 2 - 3

THE MURDER BALLAD  1 - 2 - 3

WININ’ BOY No. 1  1 - 2
Original Issue

Circle jm-55

Circle jm-56

Circle jm-57



Circle jm-58

Circle jm-59

Circle jm-60


Album IX

JELLY ROLL AND JACK THE BEAR,  Part I 'We can always get plenty to eat.'

ALABAMA BOUND

AFS Number

AFS 1664-B


AFS 1665-A


AFS 1665-B


AFS 1652-A



AFS 1654-B


AFS 1655-A


AFS 1638-A


AFS 1638-B

Original Circle Title

JELLY ROLL AND JACK THE BEAR,  Part I  1 - 2 - 3
“We can always get plenty to eat.”

JELLY ROLL AND JACK THE BEAR,  Part II  1 - 3 - 4
“One bottle can cure you.”

JELLY ROLL AND JACK THE BEAR,  Part III  1 - 3 - 4
“We got into Memphis allright.”

THE SALTY DOG  1 - 2 - 3 - 4
“They came into Chicago and turned the town upside
    down.”

ST. LOUIS  1 - 3
“That guy’s a shark.”

THE MISERERE  1 - 3
“So I swung a few of these operatic tunes.”

ALABAMA BOUND  Part I  1 - 2 - 3 - 4
“I was down on the Gulf Coast.”

ALABAMA BOUND  Concluded  1 - 2 - 3 - 4
“He had a knife right on me.”
Original Issue

Circle jm-61


Circle jm-62


Circle jm-63


Circle jm-64



Circle jm-65


Circle jm-66


Circle jm-67


Circle jm-68



Album X

SWEET PETER

THE JAZZ PIANO SOLOIST  II

AFS Number

AFS 1674-B

AFS 1676-B

AFS 1678-B

AFS 1653-A

AFS 1674-A

AFS 1660-A
Original Circle Title

SWEET PETER  1

STATE AND MADISON  1

FREAKISH  1

MY GAL SAL  1 - 2 - 3 - 4

KING PORTER STOMP  1

ORIGINAL JELLY ROLL BLUES  1 - 2 - 3 - 4
Original Issue

Circle jm-69

Circle jm-70

Circle jm-71

Circle jm-72

Circle jm-73

Circle jm-74


Album XI

THE BROADWAY SWELLS  Part I

IN NEW ORLEANS

AFS Number

AFS 1663-A

AFS 1663-B

AFS 1658-A

AFS 1658-B

AFS 2487-B

AFS 2487-A

AFS 1684-B


AFS 1681-A


Original Circle Title

THE BROADWAY SWELLS  Part I  1 - 2 - 3 - 4

THE BROADWAY SWELLS  Concluded  1 - 2 - 3 - 4

THE BUDDY BOLDEN LEGEND  Part I  1 - 2 - 3 - 4

THE BUDDY BOLDEN LEGEND  Concluded  1 - 2 - 3 - 4

THE MARCHING BANDS  Part I  3 - 4

THE MARCHING BANDS  Concluded  3 - 4

I.   CREOLE SONG  1 - 2 - 3
II.  IF YOU DON’T SHAKE  1 - 2

UNGAI HA  2 - 3
(Indian Songs at the Mardi Gras)

Original Issue

Circle jm-75

Circle jm-76

Circle jm-77

Circle jm-78

Circle jm-79

Circle jm-80 +

Circle jm-81


Circle jm-82
+


Note: Circle jm-80 + and Circle jm-82 + bear these numbers, both in the wax and on their respective labels. However, the performance content is reversed, so that Circle jm-80 plays UNGAI HA (Indian Songs at the Mardi Gras) and Circle jm-82 plays THE MARCHING BANDS Concluded. [MJL 93]



Album XII

LEVEE MAN BLUES 'It was a free and easy place.'

THE WININ’ BOY

AFS Number

AFS 1644-A


AFS 1641-B

AFS 1643-A


AFS 1686-A


AFS 1643-B

AFS 1660-B

AFS 1652-B

AFS 1687-A
AFS 1687-B

Original Circle Title

LEVEE MAN BLUES  1 - 2 - 3 - 4
(“It was a free and easy place.”)

THE STORYVILLE STORY  1 - 3 - 4

I.   THE NAKED DANCE  1 - 3
II.  SPORTING LIFE  3

I HATE A MAN LIKE YOU  1 - 3 - 4
(“I played some rollin’ stuff.”)

HONKY TONK BLUES  I  1 - 3

HONKY TONK BLUES  II  1 - 3 - 4

IF I WAS WHISKEY AND YOU WAS A DUCK 1 - 3 - 4

THE WININ’ BOY  II   1 - 3 - 4


Original Issue

Circle jm-83


Circle jm-84

Circle jm-85


Circle jm-86


Circle jm-87

Circle jm-88

Circle jm-89

Circle jm-90 ¤


Note: Circle jm-90 ¤ comprises a partial combination of AFS 1687-A and 1687-B. It contains Jelly Roll’s speech and the first verse only (from AFS 1687-A) and the second verse, the hummed and vocalised third verse, the piano interlude and fourth verse only (from AFS 1687-B).

Circle jm-90
¤ is censored for content by omitting the profanities. In 1970, when John R.T. Davies cleaned and re-pitched the original Circle 78 r.p.m. records for issue on the Classic Jazz Master and Swaggie LPs, the content of Circle jm-90 THE WININ’ BOY II was restored to its original uncensored version.

OUT OF PRINT RECORDINGS

•  CIRCLE (USA) — (jm-1—jm-90) 78 r.p.m. set of 45 records

•  CIRCLE (USA) — (L 14001—L 14012) 12 LPs

•  RIVERSIDE (USA) — (RLP 9001—RLP 9012) 12 LPs

•  CLASSIC JAZZ MASTERS (Sweden) — (CJM 2—CJM 9) 8 LPs

•  SWAGGIE (Australia) — (S 1311—S 1318) 8 LPs

REFERENCES

MJR

Mister Jelly Roll — Alan Lomax, Duell, Sloan and Pearce, New York, 1950. Page references are to the University of California Press 4th edition 2001, (Soft Cover) 344 pp.

MJL

Mr. Jelly Lord — Laurie Wright, Storyville Publications, Chigwell, Essex, 1980, 256 pp.

C

Storyville Magazine — Issue 128, dated December 1986, page 69.

D

Sweet Papa Jelly Roll — Ten Year History of Morton’s Library of Congress Recordings, Orrin Keepnews, The Record Changer, dated February 1948, pp. 6—7.

E

Roger Richard — letters and information to Mike Meddings, 1st, 5th and 6th March 2001.

F

John R.T. Davies — letter and information to Mike Meddings, 11th March 2001.

G

Bill Nowlin Ph.D. — letter and information to Mike Meddings, 27th March 2001.

H

Ate van Delden — letter and information to Mike Meddings, 12th March 2010.

Special thanks to Roger Richard for providing details and images of “The Saga of Mr. Jelly Lord” Circle Limited Edition Set of 45 twelve-inch Records (Set #224) from his collection, and to Michael Hill for providing additional rare material from his library of Jelly Roll Morton documents.

KUDOS


Michael Bowen (UK)
John H. Cowley (UK)
Prof. James Dapogny (USA)
John R.T. Davies (UK)
Ate van Delden (Netherlands)
Prof. Lawrence Gushee (USA)
Carl A. Hällström (Sweden)
Michael Hill (Australia)


Alan Lomax (USA)
Mike Meddings (UK)
Bill Nowlin  Ph.D. (USA)
Robin Penna (UK)
Roger Richard (France)
Horace Spear  M.D. (USA)
Alfred Ticoalu (USA)
Laurie Wright (UK)

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